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Workspace 101 [message #1353089] Tue, 13 May 2014 19:30 Go to next message
George Seese is currently offline George SeeseFriend
Messages: 9
Registered: May 2014
Junior Member
Workspace is not just a folder to contain projects.
When I create a new Workspace folder WS_new, Eclipse creates several subfolders:
-.metadata that has
- .plugins that has
- .org.eclipse.xxxx (6 subfolders)

If I make a new project Project_new and click Finish, folder WS_new now appears:
-WS_new
+.metadata
+Project_new

I don't see this concept (.metadata sub folder) in Netbeans.

As a newcomer, I didn't understand this concept, and wanted to move my projects into other folders. Apparently Eclipse did not like that. I had to re-install Eclipse.

I read an article that indicates that a new Workspace should be started with a new version of Eclipse.
(eclipse.dzoneDotcom/articles/eclipse-workspace-tips])

That person also suggested putting projects in a folder separate from the Workspace.
This would enable moving projects into other folders with no adverse effects on Eclipse. But this seems to be complicated.

My questions are:
What is the purpose of having .metadata etc.?
Does it provide an advantage over Netbeans?
If it relates to the version, why isn't it kept in the Eclipse folder for that version?
Once a project is made in a given Workspace folder, can it not be moved?


Re: Workspace 101 [message #1353633 is a reply to message #1353089] Wed, 14 May 2014 00:51 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Eric Rizzo is currently offline Eric RizzoFriend
Messages: 3071
Registered: July 2009
Senior Member
The workspace is a logical container for projects, and can also be physical container for them (although that's not required). Here's a description I wrote a couple of years ago on Stack Overflow:

Quote:
The workspace is designed as a logical container of projects, it just so happens that it can also be a physical container for them, too. Many times you want or need to store a project's contents in some place on your file system that is outside your workspace. One common example is with certain source control systems, you check files out into a location that's managed by the version control system (such as git, Perforce, VSS, etc). In that case, you need to have the Eclipse Project look for its contents in the version-tool-managed location instead of the Eclipse workspace.

Many people, like myself, just like to keep projects organized in my file system in different ways that aren't tied to a particular workspace. Another reason, though less common, is to have the same project loaded into two different workspaces. Remember, the workspace is a logical or virtual container; it won't always be exactly how you want projects organized on disk. If your projects are stored outside the workspace(s), that allows workspaces to be transient in the sense that you can create/delete them at will without losing your project contents.


Note that the workspace is (intentionally, by design) seprate from the Eclipse installation. Even if a workspace somehow became corrupted or a big mess, you do not need to re-install Eclipse. Similarly, if you install a new version or package of Eclipse, you can point it to your existing workspace and continue with the projects and settings that you have established there.

[Updated on: Wed, 22 July 2015 19:28]

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Re: Workspace 101 [message #1356168 is a reply to message #1353633] Thu, 15 May 2014 01:57 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Michael Murdock is currently offline Michael MurdockFriend
Messages: 26
Registered: May 2014
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Junior Member
I wish to know whether the idea of a hierarchy of folders in a workspace could work. From what I did with Eclipse 4.3.1 last year, it did not like this
either. If your idea that actual project contents be outside the workspace for maintenance of projects then this hierarchy could reside out there.
What I am not sure is how implement this.

Say I make a piece of software in a project. Then I see I can reapply part of it in another project (kind of like sister projects). Then another
version of one these could become a third project (like a child). In a simple workspace alone - this is madness.

Some books are coming for me soon on using modeling with eclipse so maybe there might be some good ideas there.

I see how the workspace displays it's contents in the left project window. I'm just wondering if some levels could be created, since it is
"virtual"...

Any ideas will be appreciated...

Michael


A solution can not be found to a problem
with the same mind that created it.
- Albert Einstein

[Updated on: Thu, 15 May 2014 01:59]

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Re: Workspace 101 [message #1356306 is a reply to message #1356168] Thu, 15 May 2014 03:23 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Nitin Dahyabhai is currently offline Nitin DahyabhaiFriend
Messages: 3882
Registered: July 2009
Senior Member

You can group them into Working Sets, and make those visible at the top level. Projects can have inter-dependencies (how this is established varies with the kind of project), but they are not to be physically nested anywhere. The workspace is the default parent location for your projects, the place to store information about those projects that's not intended to be in those projects, and possibly machine-specific details, like where your JREs are.

Nitin Dahyabhai
Eclipse Web Tools Platform

[Updated on: Thu, 15 May 2014 03:25]

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Re: Workspace 101 [message #1370405 is a reply to message #1356306] Wed, 21 May 2014 01:02 Go to previous message
Michael Murdock is currently offline Michael MurdockFriend
Messages: 26
Registered: May 2014
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Junior Member
I posted in the C/C++ thread group this would be my home language even though my questions/conundrum is with the IDE itself. Every time I download a version
& start installing the tools I need. I get so far & eventually it crashes & fails to start. I have learned where to bump up the memory to 1024m inside the
ini file (on a Mac using 10.9.2). I don't think its because of virtual space per se. It seem to occur after I have download loaded some packages that warn me this "has no certificate" or something. One plugin like this was some perl addin/ Epic I think. Another was Scala language. The later warns me it needs a heap space of 1039m which is an odd number. I do not know how to even set this.

I have a more detailed post in the C/C++ thread space. I would like to know what conflicts with what and how do I go to some central repository of knowledge to know that? I know this may sound stupid, though anyway, why can't I install Eclipse with all components from the Kepler Releases site and
why can't I add things that warn (this will collide/damage you eclipse base if you continue to install)...

Even more, once I get this offensive will not start -- read .log in workspace/.metafile/ blah blah, how do I fix it so my eclipse will start again???
huh? Any help you can lend or direct me to will be appreciated.

Thanks in advance.

Michael


A solution can not be found to a problem
with the same mind that created it.
- Albert Einstein
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