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Home » Language IDEs » C / C++ IDE (CDT) » Errors appear and disappear depending on if file is open(Strange compile behavior)
Errors appear and disappear depending on if file is open [message #989339] Wed, 05 December 2012 12:19
Wesley Miller is currently offline Wesley Miller
Messages: 4
Registered: May 2011
Junior Member
I have an inherited machine vision (opencv/pylon) project that seems to build with 0 errors, 120 warnings, etc. To accomplish this I:

- "Select All" in the "problems" window then Delete and answer Yes.
- Project -> Clean -> Clean Selected,
- Click my projectname, (and build selected project after clean is also checked).
- Enter

The Console Window shows no errors (searched with Find). (it also shows that CameraBuffer.cpp compiled with no errors -- see below)

The Problems Window show 0 errors, 120 warnings ....

Now, I open one of my files (CameraBuffer.cpp). The file shows 7 errors, the Problems WIndow updates and shows the 7 errors.

Where did those come from. The file is in my source directory (src) and other stuff in there is compiling ok.

I tried just cleaning and compiling CameraBuffer.cpp to see what happened. While the build worked find with the Clean/build (aabove) the single Compile (right click on filename, compile this file) I get errors related to the compile step trying to do a pkg-config --cflags opencv, but I suspect that's a different question. Razz

I also note that the othdr cpp files in the src directory don't offer me the chance to right-click/clean/build.


So, can someone tell me what's happening? Is eclipse remembering old errors that are tied to the file but not seen by the project? Is the project missing the errors? Do I need to just delete the file from the project and then remake it?

Tnx, Wes
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