Eclipse Community Forums
Forum Search:

Search      Help    Register    Login    Home
Home » Eclipse Projects » Commercial » Call for Papers for Rational Software Development Conference 2006 - New Open ComputingTrack
Call for Papers for Rational Software Development Conference 2006 - New Open ComputingTrack [message #7259] Wed, 21 December 2005 10:54
Eclipse User
Originally posted by: lmholitz.us.ibm.com

This is a multipart message in MIME format.
--=_alternative 005769CC872570DE_=
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"

IBM Rational Software Development Conference 2006 call papers is open and
closes January 16. This year, there is a new Open Computing track.


The call for papers URL:
https://1bosweb3.conferon.com/Events/Rational/RSDC2006/CFP/d efault.cfm

Open Computing: Open Source to Open Standards
The use of open standards keeps the computing world from becoming a Tower
of Babel. Open standards allow disparate networks to interconnect,
machines to interoperate, and applications to communicate. Some open
standards are certified by committees, while others become de facto
standards due to widespread adoption.
Open source has taken the world by storm. There seem to be open source
technologies for just about everything from development tools, to
application servers, to CRM systems. Linux is one of the fastest growing
operation systems and is used on everything from mainframes to PDAs.
Eclipse has become the foundation of the vast majority of non-.net
development tools. The Apache Web server is the industry standard. In
fact, there are open source solutions for just about every type of
software, and good ones. Finally we recognize that and give it its due
with a track dedicated to open source at the conference.
Open standards and open source are the focus of this track. They're not
the same thing, but one can lead to the other. Their value and model,
approval and adoption, and the wide variety of available solutions should
be reviewed. Sessions can cover either or both. Sessions can address how
non-open source products add value and justify their price. Sessions might
address widely-used technology provided by a single vendor in spite of a
corresponding open standard. Technical sessions that include hands-on
demos of some of the more popular and powerful open source technologies
should be well attended. Sessions that approach open source and open
standards from other angles are welcome. Testers, developers, designers,
architects, and even CTOs should learn from the sessions in this track
about open standards and the variety and value of open source solutions,
how open source works, and the future of open source and open standards.
Suggested topics include the following:
How are open standards defined and adopted?
AJAX: finally true desktop independence
What's new at Apache (Geronimo, Derby, and others)?
Open source application servers, databases, and content managers
The many open standards bodies: OASIS, W3C, and more
How de facto standards defy "approved" equivalents
A brief history of open source
Open source in China and India
Open source CRM and other business solutions
Open source development frameworks: Spring, Hibernate, and others
Open source development tools
All things Eclipse
Free software vs. open source software: there is a difference
IBM and open source: participation and policy
Open source Instant Messaging
Open source is more than Java
How is open source licensed?
Linux topics
How is Microsoft supporting open source?
Mule: an open source ESB
OpenOffice.org vs. Microsoft Office
Open source operating systems: are they secure?
Object Oriented PHP
Developing SCA-based applications with open source tools
The SCA proposed open standard
The ROI of open source
Ruby on Rails
A comparison of open source scripting languages
All about SourceForge.net?
Open source does not necessarily mean open standards
Open source Web sites
Why open source: is it worth it?
Why NOT open source: how to add value beyond open source and continue to
sell software
A survey of WS-* open standards
How open source leads to adopted open standards
XML: how it became an open standard and why

For a complete list of tracks or more information about the conference
please go to http://www-306.ibm.com/software/rational/events/rsdc2006/

--=_alternative 005769CC872570DE_=
Content-Type: text/html; charset="US-ASCII"


<br><font size=2 face="sans-serif">IBM Rational Software Development Conference
2006 call papers is open and closes January 16. This year, there is a new
Open Computing track.</font>
<br>
<br>
<br><font size=2 face="sans-serif">The call for papers URL: https://1bosweb3.conferon.com/Events/Rational/RSDC2006/CFP/d efault.cfm</font><font size=3 face="Times New Roman">
<br>
</font><font size=2 face="Times New Roman"><b><br>
Open Computing: Open Source to Open Standards</b></font><font size=3 face="Times New Roman">
</font><font size=2 face="Times New Roman"><br>
The use of open standards keeps the computing world from becoming a Tower
of Babel. Open standards allow disparate networks to interconnect, machines
to interoperate, and applications to communicate. Some open standards are
certified by committees, while others become de facto standards due to
widespread adoption.</font><font size=3 face="Times New Roman"> </font><font size=2 face="Times New Roman"><br>
Open source has taken the world by storm. There seem to be open source
technologies for just about everything from development tools, to application
servers, to CRM systems. Linux is one of the fastest growing operation
systems and is used on everything from mainframes to PDAs. Eclipse has
become the foundation of the vast majority of non-.net development tools.
The Apache Web server is the industry standard. In fact, there are open
source solutions for just about every type of software, and good ones.
Finally we recognize that and give it its due with a track dedicated to
open source at the conference.</font><font size=3 face="Times New Roman">
</font><font size=2 face="Times New Roman"><br>
Open standards and open source are the focus of this track. They're not
the same thing, but one can lead to the other. Their value and model, approval
and adoption, and the wide variety of available solutions should be reviewed.
Sessions can cover either or both. Sessions can address how non-open source
products add value and justify their price. Sessions might address widely-used
technology provided by a single vendor in spite of a corresponding open
standard. Technical sessions that include hands-on demos of some of the
more popular and powerful open source technologies should be well attended.
Sessions that approach open source and open standards from other angles
are welcome. Testers, developers, designers, architects, and even CTOs
should learn from the sessions in this track about open standards and the
variety and value of open source solutions, how open source works, and
the future of open source and open standards.</font><font size=3 face="Times New Roman">
</font><font size=2 face="Times New Roman"><br>
Suggested topics include the following:</font><font size=3 face="Times New Roman">
</font>
<ul>
<li><font size=2 face="Times New Roman">How are open standards defined
and adopted? </font>
<li><font size=2 face="Times New Roman">AJAX: finally true desktop independence
</font>
<li><font size=2 face="Times New Roman">What's new at Apache (Geronimo,
Derby, and others)? </font>
<li><font size=2 face="Times New Roman">Open source application servers,
databases, and content managers </font>
<li><font size=2 face="Times New Roman">The many open standards bodies:
OASIS, W3C, and more </font>
<li><font size=2 face="Times New Roman">How de facto standards defy &quot;approved&quot;
equivalents </font>
<li><font size=2 face="Times New Roman">A brief history of open source
</font>
<li><font size=2 face="Times New Roman">Open source in China and India
</font>
<li><font size=2 face="Times New Roman">Open source CRM and other business
solutions </font>
<li><font size=2 face="Times New Roman">Open source development frameworks:
Spring, Hibernate, and others </font>
<li><font size=2 face="Times New Roman">Open source development tools </font>
<li><font size=2 face="Times New Roman">All things Eclipse </font>
<li><font size=2 face="Times New Roman">Free software vs. open source software:
there is a difference </font>
<li><font size=2 face="Times New Roman">IBM and open source: participation
and policy </font>
<li><font size=2 face="Times New Roman">Open source Instant Messaging </font>
<li><font size=2 face="Times New Roman">Open source is more than Java </font>
<li><font size=2 face="Times New Roman">How is open source licensed? </font>
<li><font size=2 face="Times New Roman">Linux topics </font>
<li><font size=2 face="Times New Roman">How is Microsoft supporting open
source? </font>
<li><font size=2 face="Times New Roman">Mule: an open source ESB </font>
<li><font size=2 face="Times New Roman">OpenOffice.org vs. Microsoft Office
</font>
<li><font size=2 face="Times New Roman">Open source operating systems:
are they secure? </font>
<li><font size=2 face="Times New Roman">Object Oriented PHP </font>
<li><font size=2 face="Times New Roman">Developing SCA-based applications
with open source tools </font>
<li><font size=2 face="Times New Roman">The SCA proposed open standard
</font>
<li><font size=2 face="Times New Roman">The ROI of open source </font>
<li><font size=2 face="Times New Roman">Ruby on Rails </font>
<li><font size=2 face="Times New Roman">A comparison of open source scripting
languages </font>
<li><font size=2 face="Times New Roman">All about SourceForge.net? </font>
<li><font size=2 face="Times New Roman">Open source does not necessarily
mean open standards </font>
<li><font size=2 face="Times New Roman">Open source Web sites </font>
<li><font size=2 face="Times New Roman">Why open source: is it worth it?
</font>
<li><font size=2 face="Times New Roman">Why NOT open source: how to add
value beyond open source and continue to sell software </font>
<li><font size=2 face="Times New Roman">A survey of WS-* open standards
</font>
<li><font size=2 face="Times New Roman">How open source leads to adopted
open standards </font>
<li><font size=2 face="Times New Roman">XML: how it became an open standard
and why </font></ul>
<br><font size=2 face="sans-serif">For a complete list of tracks or more
information about the conference please go to http://www-306.ibm.com/software/rational/events/rsdc2006/</font>
<br>
--=_alternative 005769CC872570DE_=--
Previous Topic:Call for Papers for Rational Software Development Conference 2006 - New Open ComputingTrack
Next Topic:Announcing Eclipse Review!
Goto Forum:
  


Current Time: Fri Apr 18 17:06:36 EDT 2014

Powered by FUDForum. Page generated in 0.04222 seconds