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Developing JAXB Applications Using EclipseLink MOXy, Release 2.5
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Binary Types

There are additional items to consider when mapping to binary type fields, such as byte[] or Byte[].

Specifying Binary Formats Base64 and Hex

EclipseLink supports marshalling and unmarshalling binary data in two different representation formats: base64Binary (default) and hexBinary. You can specify the desired binary format using the @XmlSchemaType annotation, or <xml-schema-type> element in EclipseLink OXM. The examples below shows the result of marshalling the same byte[] to each of these formats.

Example 5-7 Annotations

package example;
 
import javax.xml.bind.annotation.*;
 
@XmlRootElement
public class BinaryData {
 
   @XmlSchemaType(name="hexBinary")
   public byte[] hexBytes;
 
   @XmlSchemaType(name="base64Binary")
   public byte[] base64Bytes;
 
}
 

Example 5-8 EclipseLink OXM

...
<java-type name="example.BinaryData">
    <xml-root-element/>
    <java-attributes>
        <xml-element java-attribute="hexBytes">
            <xml-schema-type name="hexBinary"/>
        </xml-element>
        <xml-element java-attribute="base64Bytes">
            <xml-schema-type name="base64Binary"/>
        </xml-element>
    </java-attributes>
</java-type>
...
 
BinaryData b = new BinaryData();
b.hexBytes = new byte[] {2,4,8,16,32,64};
b.base64Bytes = b.hexBytes;

jaxbContext.createMarshaller().marshal(b, System.out);

Example 5-9 Output

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<binaryData>
   <hexBytes>020308102040</hexBytes>
   <base64Bytes>AgMIECBA</base64Bytes>
</binaryData>
 

Understanding byte[] versus Byte[]

Unlike other Java primitive/wrapper types, EclipseLink differentiates between byte[] (primitive) and Byte[] (wrapper) data types. By default, byte[] will marshal to a single element or attribute, whereas Byte[] will marshal each byte as its own element, as illustrated by the following example:

Example 5-10 Using byte[] and Byte[]

package example;
 
import javax.xml.bind.annotation.*;
 
@XmlRootElement
public class BinaryData {
 
   public byte[] primitiveBytes;
   public Byte[] byteObjects;
 
}
 
BinaryData b = new BinaryData();
b.primitiveBytes = new byte[] {34,45,56,67,78,89,89,34,23,12,12,11,2};
b.byteObjects = new Byte[] {23,1,112,12,1,64,1,14,3,2};
 
jaxbContext.createMarshaller().marshal(b, System.out);
 

Example 5-11 Output

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<binaryData>
   <primitiveBytes>Ii04Q05ZWSIXDAwLAg==</primitiveBytes>
   <byteObjects>23</byteObjects>
   <byteObjects>1</byteObjects>
   <byteObjects>112</byteObjects>
   <byteObjects>12</byteObjects>
   <byteObjects>1</byteObjects>
   <byteObjects>64</byteObjects>
   <byteObjects>1</byteObjects>
   <byteObjects>14</byteObjects>
   <byteObjects>3</byteObjects>
   <byteObjects>2</byteObjects>
</binaryData>
 

Working with SOAP Attachments

If you are using EclipseLink MOXy in a Web Services environment, certain types of binary data may be created as an MTOM/XOP Attachment, instead of written directly into an XML element or attribute. This is done as an optimization for large amounts of binary data.

The following table shows the Java types that are automatically treated as Attachments, along with their corresponding MIME type:

Table 5-1 Java Attributes Treated as Attachments

Java Type MIME Type

java.awt.Image

image/gif

java.awt.Image

image/jpeg

javax.xml.transform.Source

text/xml

application/xml

*


javax.activation.DataHandler

*/*




NoteNote:

For more information on the basics of SOAP Attachments, see "Appendix H: Enhanced Binary Data Handling" of the Java Architecture for XML Binding (JAXB) Specification (http://jcp.org/en/jsr/detail?id=222).


The following Java class contains two binary fields: a simple byte[], and a java.awt.Image. In a Web Services environment, the Image data will automatically be created as an attachment.

Example 5-12 Sample Java Class

package example;
 
import java.awt.Image;
 
import javax.xml.bind.annotation.*;
 
@XmlRootElement
public class BinaryData {
 
   public byte[] bytes;
 
   public Image photo;
 
}
 

Marshalling the object in Example 5-12 in a Web Services environment would look something like Example 5-13 (the actual appearance will depend on your application server's implementation of AttachmentMarshaller):

Example 5-13 Resulting XML

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<binaryData>
   <bytes>Ii04Q05ZWSIXDAwLAg==</bytes>
   <photo>
      <xop:Include href="cid:1" xmlns:xop="http://www.w3.org/2004/08/xop/include"/>
   </photo>
</binaryData>
 

Using @XmlInlineBinaryData

If you would like to force your binary data to be written as an inline string in your XML, you can annotate the field with the @XmlInlineBinaryData annotation:

Example 5-14 Using the @XmlInlineBinaryData Annotation

package example;
 
import java.awt.Image;
 
import javax.xml.bind.annotation.*;
 
@XmlRootElement
public class BinaryData {
 
   public byte[] bytes;
 
   @XmlInlineBinaryData
   public Image photo;
 
}
 

This will result in an XML document like this:

 
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<binaryData>
   <bytes>Ii04Q05ZWSIXDAwLAg==</bytes>
   <photo>/9j/4AAQSkZJRgABAgAAAQABAAD/2wBDAAgGBgcGBQgHB ... Af/2Q==</photo>
</binaryData>
 

Using @XmlMimeType

You can explicitly set the MIME Type for an binary field using the @XmlMimeType annotation. Your application's AttachmentMarshaller and AttachmentUnmarshaller will be responsible for processing this information.

Example 5-15 Using the @XmlMimeType Annotation

package example;
 
import java.awt.Image;
 
import javax.xml.bind.annotation.*;
 
@XmlRootElement
public class BinaryData {
 
   public byte[] bytes;
 
   @XmlMimeType("image/gif")
   public Image photo;
 
}
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